Friday, September 7, 2007

Lupe Fiasco's "Dumb It Down"

"Conscious Me" Blogger on Lupe's new release...


http://consciousme.blogspot.com

Saturday, September 01, 2007
Lupe Fiasco - Dumb It Down

So what's really good with Lupe Fiasco? From interviews, sounds like he's a tad bit jaded by the way things have turned out with his rap career. In this business I guess you can only go but so far when corporations at the end of the day hold whether or not you will be famous in the balance. (One day we'll realize that the music we hear on commercial radio and most every media outlet is programmed. Possibly, on the same day we realize that we actually have power to affect changes in this world we're all a part of). How successful can you be with the use of 'their' money? Well, Lupe won't be dumbing down any song lyrics as he proclaims on 'Dumb It Down'.

Download - 'Dumb It Down'

Posted by I Sort Glass at Saturday, September 01, 2007

Labels: download, hiphop, Lupe Fiasco, mp3

1 comments:

Ben Brubaker said...

Lupe's "Dumb It Down" is brilliant... been waiting to hear a song dedicated entirely to this concept. The question is, will this song gain commercial success? If so, it would be a seminal track in the recent movement in response to club rap's limited and often ignorant subject matter. Hip-Hop is not to blame for all the drugs, violence and sexism so prevalent in contemporary urban youth culture... but yes, it can be a strong influence. Don't get me wrong, we (the hip-hop generation) have produced a ton of great lyricists whose messages have inspired thousands and caused positive social change across the country. The major labels are not always reeceptive however, because sex and drugs are easy ways to sell records. Still, some record labels, such as Atlantic, have recruited artists like Lupe and Saigon, giving them a chance to break into the popular market with extraordinary lyrical skill and integrity. We ought to support those artists by becoming consumers of conscious hip-hop. That way the major labels would know a knew era of hip-hop has emerged to replace the repetitive club rhetoric in the marketplace.